Want to know what's all the fuss about Kegel exercises? Here's a brief introduction to Kegel exercises, how are these working and what are the benefits.

We often hear people talking about a certain Kegel 'thing' - what and who are talking about? Well, Kegel is the name of a pelvic floor exercise, named after Dr. Kegel who discovered the exercise. He studied the muscles attached to the pelvic bone, which act like a hammock, holding in your pelvic organs.

So, where exactly inside your body can you discover them? Try to isolate these muscles try stopping and starting the flow of urine.

So, Kegel exercises are meant to strengthen the muscles which support the urethra, bladder, uterus and rectum. Before we talk about how to do these exercises, it's very important to know that it's a very simple practice, you can do it almost anytime and everywhere. But, to be sure you're doing the right thing, make sure to do the exercises for five minutes twice a day.

Introductuion to Kegel Exercises

Also, you should squeeze the muscle for a count of four and relax for a count of four. At first, you may not be able to do the exercises for a whole five minutes or hold the squeeze for a count of four( practicing it will make easier, as the muscles get stronger).

At first you can do the exercises with your knees together (lying or sitting), to be sure you are comfortable. And, of course, as in every exercise, breathing is essential - so breathe slowly and deeply.

Doing the Kegel exercises correctly and as often as you can, means stronger muscles; if they are weak, it might lead to urinary incontinence, a condition that affects women in their 40s, but also younger persons.

It's a great thing to do too if you just had a baby, as your pelvis and vagina can be severely traumatized after giving birth.