J.Crew is placing a heavy accent on color this spring 2012 season through their latest fashion collection, so take a peek at the amazing colorful combos which balance perfectly classics with urban casual chicness, characteristics that make a great visual impact!

This new spring/summer 2012 season J.Crew's creative director Jenna Lyons wanted to spice things up a bit, so she aimed for a fresh and funky collection presented at the New York Fashion Week.

The new season inspired fashion designers to go for a much bolder and blooming approach with splashes of neons and brights balanced with gorgeous nudes and timeless classic hues such as gray, black and white.

J.Crew is known for developing original and wearable designs that are a perfect match for men and women with a fun personality, people who love to dress well and make a style statement. The label's spring 2012 collection allows variety to take the stage, but keeps things on a well defined style path, a casual chic style that works from day to evening. Stylish combos of shirts with pencil skirts and wide leg pants, stylish dresses, tucked in blouses, lovely shorts and classy blazers enchanted the crowd in New York, designs which were emphasized through color and accessories. Monochromes as well as bold prints and color blocks enchanted the eyes at J.Crew, so take the brand's vision over fashion and upgrade your style and wardrobe.

Go vibrant with an all over neon ensemble for a bold and eye catching look or try to show your color coordination skills by mixing various hues to create a stylish multi-tone outfit that matches your personality perfectly. Hot pink, turquoise, yellow, red, bright green as well as less bold hues such as black, grey, soft pink, white and khaki are a perfect option for the new season!

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Photos courtesy of WWD
Photographed by Robert Mitra